2001 CAPS Conference: Renewing HIV Prevention

2001 CAPS Conference: Renewing HIV Prevention

Olga Grinstead
Artwork by CAPS Researcher Tooru Nemoto, PhD
Tom Coates

On Friday April 20, 2001, the Center for AIDS Prevention Studies, University of California San Francisco, held its first annual conference. With over 225 attendees, the conference was a resounding success. More than 40 CAPS scientists and their community research partners presented 15 workshops on the broad range of scientific research being conducted by the Center for AIDS Prevention Studies.

Ron StallMoher DowningBarry ZackJoanne Keatley

Workshop Descriptions

Session 1: 10:30 – 12:00

Track 1: Model Programs

Spring B/C

HIV Prevention for Prison Inmates and their Partners: Intervention Models and Findings

Barry Zack, MPH and Katie Kramer, MPH, MSW (Centerforce, Health Programs Division) Harold Atkins (ARIS) Olga Grinstead, PhD, MPH (CAPS)

Prison inmates and their sexual and needle sharing partners are at increased risk for HIV. Incarcerated men are ten times more likely than men in the general population to be infected with HIV, and risk is increased inside prisons and jails where condoms and sterile injection equipment are not accessible. This workshop will review the intervention programs we have conducted at San Quentin and other prisons in California. We will review the various intervention models we have used including peer education, health education and prevention case management. Barriers and facilitators of conducting programs and research in prison will be discussed and specific suggestions for feasible programs and evaluations will be offered. The workshop will include video, lecture and discussion.

Track 2: New Directions in HIV Prevention

Spring A

HIV Prevention Research with Transgender Populations

Tooru Nemoto, PhD; Don Operario, PhD; JoAnne Keatley, MSW (CAPS) Carla Clynes, BA (Projecto Contra SIDA por Vida) Tamika Gonzales, (Asian & Pacific Islander Wellness Center)

Transgender populations are at increased risk for HIV due to factors such as multiple commercial sex partners, frequent unprotected sex with primary partners, injection drug use, sharing of injection drug paraphernalia, and sex with partners who inject drugs. The workshop will provide an overview of past and present community collaborative research highlighting the following studies: HIV risk behaviors among Asian and Pacific Islander (API) male-to- female (MTF) transgenders in San Francisco; HIV risk behaviors among transgenders of color; and drug abuse treatment for MTF transgenders. This workshop will include presentation of data as well as a discussion of the program implications of the findings.

Track 3: Current Research Findings

Osaka

Condoms, collaboration, cruising, clubs and conversation: HIV Prevention Research Among Gay/Bisexual Men

Patrick Barresi MPH, Tom Coates PhD, Michael Crosby PhD, MPH, Kim Page-Shafer PhD, MPH (CAPS)

This workshop will provide an overview of some of the MSM HIV prevention research and intervention projects being carried out by CAPS scientists and community collaborators.

  • An overview of the Post Exposure Prevention intervention aimed at evaluating whether enhanced versus standard risk reduction and adherence counseling decreases subsequent HIV sexual risk and STDs and improves adherence to PEP medications.
  • Key lessons gleaned by investigators during the development and initial implementation phases of EXPLORE, a randomized control trial of HIV prevention counseling for MSM currently underway in Boston, Chicago, Denver, New York City, San Francisco, and Seattle.
  • An overview of the CHAT project, an intervention aimed at helping substance-using men and women increase their adherence to their HIV medications.
  • The findings of the HOT study, covering risk perception, behaviors and risk of acquiring HIV from from oral sex.

Track 4: Methods

Garden A

Epidemiology: What it Is, How to Use It, and How Not To

Dan Wohlfeiler, MPH, (UCSF); Michael Samuel, DrPhD

How do you know if data are reliable or not? This interactive workshop will review basic epidemiological concepts that are useful for program planners and advocates. We’ll cover how data are collected, strengths and weaknesses of our data collection systems, and what the numbers all mean. We’ll review the basics about probability, sample size, and the difference between rates and real numbers. We’ll then cover how data are used, not used, and misused by HIV program planners and advocates, and the pros and cons of “rigorous” vs. “creative” interpretation of data. We’ll also identify additional resources for further learning.

Track 5: Dissemination and Outreach Strategies

Garden B

How to Write About What You Do

Pamela DeCarlo (CAPS)

This workshop will offer a step-by-step guide to writing about an agency, program or research project. This is an interactive workshop where participants will write about what their own activities, as well as listen to others and write about their programs. The goal of the workshop is to demystify the process of writing and to help participants focus and synthesize their writing for specific audiences (funder, client, other CBOs, general media). Topics covered will be: Journalism 101; Writing Is All About Talking; Individual Writing Exercise; Small Group Writing and Listening Exercise; Pitching to Different Audiences. Participants should leave with a written outline and/or beginning paragraphs on the topic of their choice.

Session 2: 1:30 – 3:00

Track 1: Model Programs

Garden A

Hermanos de Luna y Sol – The Building of an Empowered Community

Rafael Diaz, PhD, MSW, (Institute for Sexuality, Inequality, and Health, San Francisco State University, formerly of CAPS) Mario Callitzin Huerta, (Mission Neighborhood Health Center)

This workshop will present an overview of the history, structure, activities, and evaluation methods of Hermanos de Luna y Sol (HLS), a highly successful and innovative community-based HIV prevention program for Latino gay and bisexual men in San Francisco based on principles of empowerment education. The HLS program was designed to promote a sense of social support for self-identified Latino gay and bisexual men, increase perceptions of sexual control, reduce perceptions and beliefs about the inevitability of HIV infection, and promote the ability for self-regulation in the domain of sexuality.

Participants attending this workshop will learn how HLS was formed, how it evolved, and what has made it such a successful intervention. By engaging in experiential activities, they will get a sense of the nature of the work conducted in our program’s group sessions. In addition, they will learn how HLS has combined research with service provision, generating scientific data that demonstrates the program’s impact on the behaviors of program members.

Track 2: New Directions in HIV Prevention

Spring B/C

Childhood Sexual Abuse and HIV: What We Know, What You Know, and What We Can Do Together

Sonya Grant Arreola, PhD, MPH, Barbara VanOss Marin, PhD (CAPS) Rachel Kimerling, PhD, (SFGH)

Multiple studies show that childhood sexual abuse (CSA) is a strong predictor of risk for HIV infection. Behavioral scientists are now beginning to investigate how and why CSA may lead to risk for HIV infection. This workshop will begin with a brief presentation on what is currently known about the link between CSA and risk for HIV infection, and what these findings suggest about intervention with individuals who have a history of CSA. This will be followed by a breakout session with small groups where participants will discuss how CSA is handled in actual practice. Sample questions to be discussed include: How often does CSA come up as an issue for clients; how does it come up; what do providers typically do with this information; how important is this compared to other issues; and how can research help? Finally, the groups will reconvene to share findings with the entire group, and consider next steps and needed resources.

Track 3: Current Research Findings

Osaka

Current Directions in AIDS Prevention Research in the Developing World

Jeffrey S. Mandel, PhD, MPH, Debbie Bain, MPH (CAPS) Suneeta Krishnan, PhD, Katia Alves, MPH, Witness Moyo, MS, (Fogarty International AIDS Research Training Program, UCB)

Jeff Mandel, Co-Director of CAPS International Programs, will provide an overview of AIDS prevention research studies being carried out by colleagues from developing countries in collabo-ration with CAPS faculty. Examples of ongoing work in Africa, Asia and Latin America will be presented.

  • Suneeta Krishnan will present her ethnographic study of power and vulnerability, research on the relationships between gender caste and class inequalities, and vulnerability to sexually transmitted diseases in rural south India.
  • Katia Alves will discuss her work on risk factors for incident HIV infection among anonymous HIV testers in Santos, Brazil.
  • Witness Moyo will present results from his research on STD management and factors associated with partner notification among men and women seeking STD treatment in Harare, Zimbabwe.
  • Debbie Bain will discuss a program to improve HIV counseling skills and testing the feasibility of anonymous HIV testing sites in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. She will also speak about an educational intervention project being conducted among HIV-negative male STD patients in Mumbai, India.

Track 4: Methods

Spring A

Finding, Selecting, and Adapting Evaluated HIV Prevention Interventions

Ellen Goldstein, MA(CAPS)

This workshop will explore the process of assessing and tailoring an evaluated HIV prevention program to best suit agency clients and staff. In both large and small group work, we’ll practice the process of assessment. The workshop will help identify criteria for the following three key questions: What is the intervention? Can this agency do it? Is it appropriate for our clients? Additionally, resources for finding HIV prevention program information will be outlined. All participants will be given printed materials covering topics discussed in the workshop setting.

CDC is increasing its distribution of evaluated intervention packages and researchers are increasingly disseminating evaluated models of HIV prevention programs. Yet how can agencies critique these “models” to see which might be appropriate for their agency and clients? What groundwork needs to be done at the agency before adopting a model intervention from the research world?

Track 5: Dissemination and Outreach Strategies

Garden B

Creative Use of Community Resources for Dissemination of Critical Research Findings

Moher Downing, MA; Karen Vernon, BA; Nina Mulia, PhD, (CAPS)

Findings often languish in file cabinets. Important data that was difficult to collect accumulates from study to study. How do you get off that un-merry merry-go-round and inspire your colleagues and the community where you work to come up with a plan that allows everyone to share study results? This workshop will focus on: creating a community resource inventory, including people, institutions, organizations, & other hidden treasures; putting together a core dissemination group; motivating the group; developing and implementing the dissemination plan; developing a timeline; assigning tasks; teaching the community to use the findings and following-up The workshop will be “hands-on.”

Participants are encouraged to attend with another colleague either from the same community or area of interest in order to develop a plan. The goal of this workshop is to complete a dissemination plan, and if time allows, to present it to the group.

Session 3: 3:30 – 5:00

Track 1: Model Programs

Spring B/C

The Mpowerment Project: A Community-level HIV Prevention Intervention for Young Gay/Bisexual Men

Susan Kegeles, PhD; Greg Rebchook, PhD (CAPS)

The Mpowerment Project is a community level HIV prevention intervention designed to reduce the frequency of unprotected anal intercourse among young gay men, ages 18-29, by mobilizing young gay men to support each other about safer sex. It is a gay-positive and sex-positive peer-based intervention based on an empowerment model in which young men take charge of the project. The project draws on the theory of diffusion of innovations. The goal of the program is to create a stronger and healthier young gay men’s community in which safer sex becomes the mutually accepted norm. The Mpowerment Project is listed in the Compendium of HIV Prevention Interventions with Evidence of Effectiveness and is the only scientifically-developed and empirically-tested intervention that has been shown to reduce HIV sexual risk taking behaviors among young gay men.

This workshop will present the project’s theoretical foundation and guiding principles and provide examples of how MPowerment has been conducted in different communities. Workshop participants will learn about the project’s operating structure as well as receive an overview of the programs’ components through presentations and video. Participants will also discuss how Mpowerment can be adapted for their own communities.

Track 2: New Directions in HIV Prevention

Osaka

The Prevention for Positives Movement and Initiatives

Cynthia Gomez, PhD (CAPS), Mike Shriver (Office of the Mayor, San Francisco; ARI Policy Research Center)

This workshop will provide an overview of primary prevention for HIV+ people, including needs for and barriers to primary HIV prevention that targets HIV-infected individuals. We will focus on three current interventions studies: 1) Bay Men, a program for HIV+ gay and bisexual men to reduce their sexual risk-taking behaviors and provide the opportunity for men to meet other HIV+ men to discuss sex, dating, health and other issues that may impact their lives. 2) Voice, a program for HIV+ IDUs to reduce risky sexual and drug use practices; increase access to and use of HIV primary health care; and increase access and adherence to HIV treatments.3) HIV+ Demonstration Project, a multi-component, multi-agency effort to address the needs of San Francisco HIV+ communities. These will be followed by a discussion of how providers, researchers, and policy-makers may adopt these efforts in ways that do not increase stigma and discrimination against HIV+ persons.

Track 3: Current Research Findings

Spring B/C

New Research from the Traineeships in AIDS Prevention Studies

Sonya Grant Arreola, PhD, MPH, Elise Riley, PhD, MPH, Pilgrim Spikes, PhD, MPH, Janet Wojcicki, PhD (CAPS)

This panel will highlight research being conducted by members of CAPS’ Traineeships in AIDS Prevention, a post-doctoral fellowship program.

  • Sonya Grant Arreola, PhD, MPH will present on “Childhood Sexual Abuse, HIV-Risk Behaviors and Latino Gay Men,” a project that uses qualitative research to increase our understanding of why and how CSA is linked to HIV infection.
  • Elise Riley, PhD, MPH will present on “Determining the Overall Health of Homeless Individuals in San Francisco”, a study with David Bangsberg, PhD. to measure overall health and subsequently determine predictors of “good” health among HIV+ homeless and marginally housed individuals
  • Pilgrim Spikes, PhD, MPH will discuss his work on “Creating Community between Young and Older African-American Men Who Have Sex with Men in the East Bay”. This project will explore ways to decrease social isolation of young African-American MSM (AAMSM) by: 1) investigating the survival strategies used by younger and older AAMSM; 2) promoting contact with older AAMSM, and 3) exploring the development of a formal mentoring program between younger and older AAMSM.
  • Janet Wojcicki, PhD will present Katherine Fritz’s research on “HIV Risk Behavior and Prevention Opportunities among Men Attending Beerhalls in Harare, Zimbabwe.” She will discuss high levels of HIV incidence and seropreva-lence and designs for future interventions.

Track 4: Methods

Spring A

Good Questions, Better Answers: Using Evaluation to Enrich your HIV Prevention Programs

Olga Grinstead, PhD MPH; Beth Freedman, MPH (CAPS)

Service providers are continually gathering valuable information from multiple sources about how to strengthen their HIV prevention programs. This workshop offers participants tips and skills on systematically collecting and using this information to better meet the needs of clients, also known as formative evaluation. We will begin with an overview of the various types of program evaluation, discussing when an agency would benefit from each type. We will then focus on formative evaluation. Through demonstrations and small-group activities, we will practice specific methods of doing formative evaluation such as conducting focus groups, conducting in-depth one-on-one interviews, and developing brief surveys. At the end of the session, participants will have an opportunity to develop questions that their organization would like to explore through formative evaluation. Workshop participants will also receive Good Questions, Better Answers, a handbook for service providers on conducting formative evaluation.

Track 5: Dissemination and Outreach Strategies

Garden B

New Approaches to Increasing the Effectiveness of Outreach to Drug Users

Ross Gibson, PhD (CAPS) Les Pappas (Better World Advertising)

This workshop will cover effective methods for reaching drug users, a so-called “hard to reach” population. This research/marketing firm team has succesfully developed methods for organizing IDUs and getting health information to them using drug users’ networks. Topics covered will include 1) scientific evidence of the effectiveness of street outreach, 2) social/diffusion approaches to outreach to drug users’ networks, 3) social marketing adjuncts to effective outreach and 4) new methodologies for increasing the “reach” of outreach and social marketing.

Cynthia GomezGreg RebchookBarbara MarinPilgrim Spikes

Kim ShaferDan Wohlfeiler

Last modified: November 2, 2012